Audubon's Field Guide to Birding Trails

Audubon's Field Guide to Birding Trails

There are a lot of species to see out there. Here are four sets of regional birding trails to guide you to some of the country's great spots.

By Kenn Kaufman
Published: July-August 2008

Utah's Great Salt Lake Birding Trail: The Bonneville Salt Flats of northwest Utah may be some of the most lifeless acres on the continent, but the nearby Great Salt Lake and the mountains to the east are teeming with life, including more than 200 species of birds. The Wasatch Audubon Society created a partnership that assembled a set of birding trails that encompass more than 50 of the best sites in this region. A number of the richest sites are on the Great Salt Lake itself, including the marshes of the fabled Bear River Refuge, where great flocks of white pelicans, marbled godwits, yellow-headed blackbirds, western grebes, and numerous other birds swarm in the shallows, vying for your attention. Even on the lakeshore's more open or barren parts, you can find pale little snowy plovers, elegant American avocets and black-necked stilts, and other shorebirds. The mountains that rise to the east of the lake, famed for their skiing in winter, offer an array of different habitats for birds in all seasons. Shady canyons filled with cottonwoods give way to spruce forest, with typical montane birds such as the elegantly patterned Williamson's sapsucker and Cassin's finch. At the highest levels, patches of tundra above treeline are among the likeliest places in the world for you to find the rare black rosy-finch. For more information,visit the Great Salt Lake Birding Trails or contact the Wasatch Audubon Society (801-621-7595).

Southeastern Arizona Birding Trail: Southeastern Arizona, where isolated mountain ranges rear up like islands in a sea of desert grassland, lures you with more than 400 bird species, including dozens that spill across the border from Mexico. This birding trail, sponsored by the Southeastern Arizona Bird Observatory with help from the Tucson Audubon Society, identifies 52 key sites for finding those birds. If you go expecting to find only desert, you'll be in for a shock. Magnificent desert vistas are here, of course, but the lowlands also have riverside forests, home to specialty birds like sleek gray hawks and noisy Abert's towhees. The mountain summits are draped in pine and fir forests, habitat for stunning red-faced warblers, Mexican chickadees, and other prized finds. Many of the sites on the birding trail are noted for hummingbirds; more than a dozen species occur here--the highest concentration in the United States--from the minuscule Calliope hummingbird to the blue-throated hummingbird, which is as big as a sparrow. Some of the most exciting birding awaits you in rocky tree-lined canyons that snake through the foothills. These are the haunts of such Mexican-border rarities as the sulphur-bellied flycatcher, the buff-collared nightjar, the thick-billed kingbird, and the fabulously colorful elegant trogon, the northernmost member of a purely tropical family of birds. For more information, check out the Southeastern Arizona Birding Trail Map or contact the Tucson Audubon Society (520-629-0510).

Colorado Birding Trail: You may be lured to Colorado by the high peaks of the Rockies, which dominate the state, dividing the mesas of the west from the short-grass prairies to the east. But you won't be able to avoid falling in love with other landscapes along the Colorado Birding Trail. In the treeless terrain of the prairies, many songbirds take to the sky to sing, and the air is often filled with the flight-songs of lark buntings and chestnut-collared and McCown's longspurs. These short-grass plains are also the haunt of the rare mountain plover, a poorly named bird that sees mountains only from a distance. When you wind into the mountains you can discover red-naped sapsuckers and sky-blue mountain bluebirds in the aspen groves, and pine grosbeaks and red crossbills chattering in the conifer forests. At the high summits, where the open tundra comes alive with wildflowers in summer, you may be lucky enough to find the white-tailed ptarmigan, a master of camouflage, which is near its southernmost limits here. Everywhere in Colorado, from mountains to plains, you'll find peak experiences. For more information, visit the Colorado Birding Trail or contact Audubon Colorado (303-415-0130).

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Kenn Kaufman

Type: Author | From: Audubon Magazine

Comments

This is wonderful! I love

This is wonderful! I love that it can be downloaded. Like the format and concise information. Such a difficult task to choose which trails to include!

WHAT ABOUT CAPE COD?

WHAT ABOUT CAPE COD?

No Midwest

The Midwest is missing from my email - how disappointing!

Where is the Midwest?

I want to add that I, too, am disappointed that the Midwest (other than the Great River trail) was almost entirely overlooked. I thought at first I had accidentally skipped some pages.

To everyone posting about missing sections

No sections are missing. Click on "Show full page" at the bottom, below the individual page numbers, and all the sections people are saying are missing will show up. I can see them all.

To bad they need to hide the

To bad they need to hide the midwest.

Midwest trails

What do you mean there's no information about Midwest trails? The whole entire section called "STOPOVER COUNTRY" is about the Midwest. It's the last section listed, so you either have to scroll through to the later pages or click on "full page" to view the entire article.

Birding trails

Why not Audubon's trail, at his home in Audubon, PA?

Birding trails

Why not Audubon's trail, at his home in Audubon, PA?

Where is the Midwest?

I want to add that I, too, am disappointed that the Midwest (other than the Great River trail) was almost entirely overlooked. I thought at first I had accidentally skipped some pages.

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