Growing Public Skepticism About Climate Change Fuels Interest in Split Between Climatologists and Weathercasters

Growing Public Skepticism About Climate Change Fuels Interest in Split Between Climatologists and Weathercasters

Alisa Opar
Published: 03/30/2010

I am surprised that more weathercasters don’t believe climate science. The New YorkTimes hints that part of the explanation may be resentment: climatologists have doctoral degrees and positions at universities or research centers; weathercasters are only required to have a college degree.

 

Whatever the reason, there are efforts underway to bridge the gap. The George Mason survey, for instance, was part of a National Science Foundation-funded research project on meteorologists. Researchers will incorporate the survey data into developing and testing 30-second, educational segments that weathercasters can use in their daily broadcasts to educate viewers about the link between predicted (or current) extreme weather events and the changing global climate.

In educating their communities about climate change, perhaps meteorologists, trusted and important sources, will better inform themselves, too.

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