The Gunnison sage-grouse gets another crack at the Endangered Species List

The Gunnison sage-grouse gets another crack at the Endangered Species List

Brianna Elliott
Published: 04/09/2013
  1. 1. True. The Gunnison sage-grouse is much smaller than the greater sage-grouse, about the size of a chicken. Before being identified as its own species, the Gunnison sage-grouse was most commonly mistaken for the greater sage-grouse. 
  2. 2. (C) Small rodents. The Gunnison sage-grouse’s diet consists of insects, flowers, buds, leaves, fruit and stems, according to All About Birds. 
  3. 3. (A) Periods of prolonged drought have occurred in the west, which are said to reduce their reproductive output. Their small population size makes them susceptible to environmental weather events. 
  4. 4. (D) All of the above. The males make hooting and popping noises during mating displays, and both sexes make clucking and clacking noises. Check out their call on All About Birds
  5. 5. (D) 7-9 eggs. These birds have rather large clutch sizes, and lay their nests on the ground. Incubation lasts for 27 or 28 days, but Gunnison sage-grouse have rather low nesting success, about 43 percent for birds in the Gunnison Basin. Chicks are precocial, meaning they are able to leave the nest within several days after hatching. 

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