Oil Spill Photo Gallery: Oiled Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, Part 2

Oil Spill Photo Gallery: Oiled Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, Part 2

Kim Hubbard
Published: 06/06/2010
The oiled wildlife rehabilitation center in Fort Jackson, La., is the recipient of all birds, and occasionally other creatures, affected by the spill. It serves as an animal MASH until that cleans and cares for the creatures until they are well enough to be released.  More info can be found at tristatebird.org and IBRRC.org.
 

Sign in front of the oiled wildlife center in Fort Jackson, La. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


An oiled Gannett that had spent three days on a boat prior to being brought into the wildlife center. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


The oiled wildlife rehabilitation center in Fort Jackson, La. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

   


An oiled Gannett is weighed. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


A Snapping turtle thought to be oiled. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


Measuring a pelican's bill helps determine its gender. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


A oiled Gannett's wing is examined for damage. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


An oiled Brown Pelican has a fish hook and abscess removed from it's body. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


Sample feathers from oiled birds are kept as evidence. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


An oiled Gannett is given Pepto Bismol. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


A Diamondback terrapin thought to be oiled. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


Jay Holcomb, director of the oiled wildlife rehabilitation center, shows a "noose carpet" used to capture oiled shorebirds. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


An oiled Herring Gull receives fluids. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


A Snapping turtle's temperature is too low to register on a regular thermometer. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


An oiled Brown Pelican is offered capelin, but the bird refuses to eat. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


Jay Holcomb checks on a Gannett that is recuperating after being cleaned. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


A Cattle Egret and Laughing Gull recuperating after being cleaned. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine

 


Jay Holcomb shows the medal that was presented by Interior Secretary Ken Salazar when he visited the center. Photo by Kim Hubbard/Audubon Magazine