Win a Copy of ‘The Laws Guide to Drawing Birds’

Win a Copy of ‘The Laws Guide to Drawing Birds’

A new book offers a novel array of tips that are easy and rewarding to follow.

By the Audubon Editors
Published: 08/15/2013
Magazine Category

Comments

I am a nature loving Folk

I am a nature loving Folk Artist from Alabama and for the most part I have taught myself how to paint from books. Always wanting to grow and feel this book would help me take the way I paint birds to another level. The book giving me the ability to identify the type of bird would also be a plus to further the connection of the art by those who see it. My email is

I cannot wait to read this

I cannot wait to read this book!

I love watching the different

I love watching the different bird species that come to eat at my feeders in my garden. I even love my biggest guest of the past two years and that is the sharp shin hawk. I would consider it a pleasure and challenge to learn to draw these beautiful, graceful animals. Even on days when I'm down I can count on my little clownish black capped chickadees to make me smile.
Sincerely Lisa Larramendy

I love birds, wild or

I love birds, wild or companions!

As an ornithologist and and

As an ornithologist and and artist, this would be a wonderful addition to my collection.

Deanne

I have a friend who is

I have a friend who is learning to draw birds and has very promising talent. I would love to win a copy for her.

I cannot wait to read this

I cannot wait to read this book!

I have been actively birding

I have been actively birding with backyard feeders and on daytrip outings for the last twenty years. One of my favorite bird watching venues is from the seat of a sweep eight, rowing at daybreak practices in the central NJ area. Lots of waterfowl, swallows and a resident pair of bald eagles. As a former draftsman the drawings in my field notebooks lean towards the "mechanical"...any chance for improvement in my drawing and sketching skills leading to more lifelike representations would be magical.

It is an irony that a still

It is an irony that a still bird is either difficult to see or dead. It is an unbound privilege to be able to capture the quintessential view of a bird be it through a pair of binoculars, a camera, or through one's putting pencil to paper. What makes birding exciting is catching the fleeting glimpses of never-still-long-enough birds. The final act of artistry will always be one's own drawing, inspired by the real world and artists before us.

My son is a budding

My son is a budding ornithologist and artist. This book would be perfect for him!

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