Birds

Audubon Magazine

Wild Staten Island Turkeys Everywhere

A population of wild, roving turkeys has Staten Island in a flap.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

The Illustrated Aviary: Wild Turkey

Reimagining John James Audubon's "Birds of North America."
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Question: Do Birds Have Belly Buttons?

You may be surprised by the answer.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

When Emus Invade

The large, flightless birds have taken over an Australian town, and they're hungry.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Yellow-billed Cuckoos, Red Knots Proposed for Endangered Listing

A federal decision could offer hope to a pair of imperiled bird species.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

15 Facts About Raptors

Random and amazing tidbits about birds of prey.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

The 2014 Audubon Guide to Binoculars

When it comes to birdwatching, what you choose to look through makes all the difference.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

10 Reasons to Be Thankful for Birds

Whether you’re eating turkey or tofurky this Thanksgiving, raise a glass to the many ways in which wild birds enrich our lives—and in fact support our very existence.  
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Wild Turkey on the Rocks?

The reintroduction of America's beloved holiday fowl has been one of conservation's great triumphs--but now some populations are plummeting. What's going on?
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

How Can Birds Roost on One Leg?

Many songbirds, such as cardinals or finches, sleep perched in the safety of dense trees or shrubs. When they fall asleep, they stand on one leg. 
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Japanese Cafés Use Live Owls to Attract Customers

First there were cat cafés, now people are flocking to owl coffee shops.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

The Illustrated Aviary: California Quail

Reimagining John James Audubon's "Birds of North America."
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Pigeons Follow Their Noses Home

Homing pigeons use scents carried on the breeze to navigate.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

The World’s Largest Owls Need Huge Trees

Scientists uncover why the Blakiston's fish owl depends on old-growth forests.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

For Birds, Singing More Songs Has Trade-offs

A larger repertoire might mean a weaker memory for song sparrows.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Protective Vests Help Chickens Cross the Road

Chickens can now safely cross the street.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Play a Song, Hurt a Bird?

A new study warns that taped playbacks used to attract birds might be harming them.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Are Canada Geese Migratory or Not?

It's the time of year that geese migrate. So why are there so many still hanging around?
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Why Do Gulls Have a Red Spot on Their Bills?

The answer helped develop the science of animal behavior.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Birds Return to a Rat-Free Island

A small seabird is rebounding now that the rodents are gone.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Listening to Migrating Birds at Night May Help Ensure Their Safety

On autumn and spring evenings, hundreds of thousands, sometimes millions of birds migrate across North America. Cutting-edge recording devices are capturing the tiny chips and chirps these birds make while in flight, helping conservationists plot a protected course.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

The Lure of the Common Loon

Joe Ricketts pledges $6.5 million to save an icon of the northern lakes.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Why Dippers Dip

Bobbing in turbulent water helps conceal this bird from predators. 
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

A Project Tracks Oystercatchers to Save Them

Wildlife biologists are on the trail of a much-beloved beach bird, trying to get a fix on where it spends the off-season. 
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Eight Great Fall Birding Trails

Autumn migration season is here. Millions of birds are on the wing, covering thousands of miles across oceans and continents. Grab your favorite field guide and hit the road to see one of the greatest wildlife spectacles on earth.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

A California Lake Becomes a Stopover Spot Again

Two hundred miles north of Los Angeles, windswept Owens Lake was the victim of one of the most audacious water grabs in the history of the American West. Now it is the site of one of its most innovative restorations—resurrecting a critical pit stop for migrating birds.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

A Bill to Ban Lead Ammunition Could Protect California Condors

California outlaws lead ammo to safeguard an iconic bird.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Win a Copy of ‘The World’s Rarest Birds’

Gorgeous, photo-filled book highlights endangered, often unknown, birds.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Fake Marbled Murrelet Eggs Cause Jays to Vomit

Scientists thwart Steller's jays by tricking them into eating eggs that make them puke.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Audubon View

Transforming an auto impound yard into a haven for birds.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine