Birds

Sculptures Bring Big Birds to New York City

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Numbers Game: Turkeys

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Earth Almanac

Porcupine passion; an eight-legged lynx; more.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Birding the Net Favorite Species Roundup

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Partners for Puffins

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Bird Quiz: Florida Scrub Jay

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Birding the Net: A New Way to Experience Birds

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Travel Dynamics International

African Pygmy Kingfisher

An Extinct Woodpecker Flies Back Into View

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

How Do Hurricanes Affect Birds?

When severe weather hits, humans hunker down. But what about the feathered among us?
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Alan D. Wilson

Mourning Dove

New Zealand Penguin Rescuers Need Knitters

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Fall Migration Hot Spots

With autumn on the horizon, you can soon witness—up close and in person—billions of wings on the go in peak season. Here are six of my favorite lookouts.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
BirdSource
BirdSource

Figure 2: Map showing where Evening Grosbeak numbers are exhibiting the most serious declines between 1980 and 1998.

BirdSource

Figure1: Animated map of Evening Grosbeak distribution between 1988 and 1998.

Jane Ogilvie

Evening Grosbeak

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

This species' Breeding Bird Survey trend map available at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center's website documents a patchwork quilt across North America, with nesting kestrels increasing some regions and decreasing in others.

BirdSource

The fluctuation in numbers of kestrels on Christmas Bird Counts in the 1990's, detailed in the second map, perhaps shows how this small falcon fares after harsh winters, or at least how far the migratory birds have moved by early winter. In addition, the conversion of much agricultural land to urban areas could adversely affect American Kestrels; nesting cavities, fields and thickets, and the American Kestrel's prey base itself may be in decline over many areas of North America. To view animation, click on map.