Magazine Blog

All Swamped Out

Swamps are great for wildlife, but it gives home to one critter no one wants.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

My Husband Loves Me

Ugandans use bicycles so much, they even become gifts of love.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Shade Coffee Gets Even Better

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

New Year, New Diet: Become a Climatarian

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Obama tourists swarm a land of disappearing forest birds

“I am Obama’s brother!” a stranger shouted to me through the open window of a matatu (small bus) as I was crossing the lush countryside of western Kenya. That was 2006. According to a New York Times article this week, cars in western Kenya “now sport bumper stickers with statements like ‘Obama, first cousin.’” Kenya has claimed America’s president-elect as its own, and the badge is revitalizing tourism, which plummeted following the gruesome riots during the country’s elections last December. Kogelo, the village where Obama’s father grew up, has become a hot ticket on Kenya’s tourist trail, according to the Times article. But there is another reason to visit the region: Kakamega Rainforest. Home to more than 400 species of birds and five types of monkeys, Kakamega is a bite-sized remnant of the vast tropical forest that once spanned the waist of Africa. The forest is being chipped away, but two guru birders aim to save it.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Paradise Lost

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Journey to Uganda

Weighing life's dangers
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

The 100th Staten Island Christmas Bird Count

I do it because it is a ritual and a ritual is something you just do.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Goose Eggs May Sustain Some Polar Bears

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Caroling Coyotes

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Forever (Almost) Amber

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

New Climate Change Report: The sky isn

A new report on abrupt climate change doesn’t necessarily say the sky is falling but portrays a complex world that it is clearly undergoing great change. Some change has been wrought by humans and some seems unrelated to our presence on the planet. The Southwest may be drying up, although we didn’t necessarily do it. Greenland and Antarctica are melting; we didn’t necessarily do it but we are certainly contributing. Warm, salty currents in the Atlantic Ocean that circulate heat probably won’t collapse this century, but they could. And the catastrophic methane release some scientists have predicted is unlikely to happen anytime soon, but methane, a greenhouse gas significantly more potent than carbon dioxide, will surely continue to increase in the atmosphere.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Let it Snow!

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Christmas Bird Countdown!

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Mercury in Fish: An Agency Conflicted

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Uncovering How Wildlife Corridors Work

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

The Holidays: Green 'Em Up

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Poznan Poses Many Problems

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

India: Tiger

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

The Spirit Bird

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Climate Watch: Get Ready to Enlist

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Save Farmland: Yes, You Can

Have Your Own Story? We would love to hear what you, your neighbors, or your town are doing to save farmland and open space. Post a comment below and tell us about your experiences.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Pondering Pecans

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Australia: Beautiful and Bizarre

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine