Magazine Blog

The Fungus Among Us

Just in time for Halloween, scientists may be one step closer to solving the mystery of a fatal illness afflicting one of the icons of the underworld—bats. In the last two years more than 100,000 bats in the northeastern United States have died from a disease known as white-nose syndrome. Identified by the namesake white, powdery substance on the bats’ muzzles, ears, and wings, this puzzling affliction emaciates and dehydrates the nocturnal animals during their hibernation period. Now scientists have isolated a fungus that could be the culprit attacking bats with vampire-like swiftness.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

A Thousand Giants

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Wild Hogs Advance North, Threatening Birds, Crops and Pork Production

Texas is infested with wild hogs, as are Louisiana and Florida, and now an ever-expanding population is sweeping south to north, wreaking havoc in states like Oregon, Wisconsin and Missouri. Wild hogs are smart, athletic and elusive, which makes them an exciting prey for hunters, who truck hogs in from out of state for the chance to go at them on their own turf. But once introduced, hog numbers explode; for conservationists, farmers and pork producers the animals are a nightmare.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Halloween's Patron Saints

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Taking Control of Water

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

S O L A R ...in a big way

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Sending the Kids Back Outside

Two new studies add to the mounting evidence that kids need time in the outdoors for their health.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Australia: Bungle Bungle

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Crying Wolf

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Let 'Em Eat Lobstah!

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

The Liquid Amber Tree

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Catch of the Day

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Saves Lives, Saves Money

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Between a Rock and a Hot Place

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Japan: Snow Monkeys

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Environmental Winners

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Whoopers Whopped Again

Of the 289 whooping cranes brought to central Florida since 1993 under the guidance of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service only 31 have survived and just nine chicks have hatched in the wild. After meetings last month in which models were presented that pegged the birds’ chances of surviving at less than 50/50, the recovery team made the decision to halt the reintroduction.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

$1Million Home Is For the Birds

Condors at San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park get a new breeding facility one year to the day after their last home burned in a wildfire.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

"Slow Aging" In Animals Intrigues Biologists

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Possum Apples

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Wildlife Trumps Football

More and more people are going into the wild. But unlike the book by Jon Krakauer, or Sean Penn’s movie, where Christopher McCandless torches his money in the desert, these wilderness seekers are spending big bucks. Wildlife watchers generated $122.6 billion in 2006, according to a recently released U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service report, equivalent to the amount of money spent on spectator sports, amusement parks, arcades, bowling alleys and ski slopes combined.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

When the Milkweeds Explode

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Exhibiting Climate Change

A new climate change exhibit opens at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City before embarking on a worldwide tour. Nothing gets left out in the cold with this comprehensive, and engaging, look at the world's biggest problem.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

The Green Side of $700 Billion

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Biofuel

In 1731 a Dutch commission described the shipworms that literally ate the dikes of Holland as a “horrible plague.” Almost two-hundred years later shipworms chewed their way through the piers and wharves of San Francisco. But these despised, wood-eating, wormlike mollusks are now being touted in the search for more practical biofuels.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Lost Penguins Fly Home

Penguins swim too far north in Brazil but find a ride home in a military plane.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Red List Shows Extinction Crisis

The International Union for Conservation of Nature releases their 2008 Red List of Threatened Species as a call to action for imperiled species.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Review: Peterson Field Guide to Birds of North America

A new updated Peterson's guide including all the birds of North America published in celebration of the centennial of the birth of Roger Tory Peterson
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine