Alaska

John Schoen
South Prince of Wales Island, Tongass National Forest
Jim Shear

Julie and Bart Koehler

Subhankar Banerjee

A band of caribou from Alaska's Teshekpuk Lake herd migrates across the vast coastal plain, traveling from calving grounds to windier areas where mosquitoes and bot flies are less likely to swarm. Protecting calving grounds, migration routes, and insect-relief areas is critical to the herd's health and survival.

Subhankar Banerjee

Snow geese with chicks. (Oil and the Geese series)

Subhankar Banerjee

Snow geese with their blue-gray young cross a tundra polygon, a common feature in the western Arctic's permafrost landscape.

Subhankar Banerjee

"Known and Unknown Tracks" (Oil and the Geese series)

Subhankar Banerjee

The Teshekpuk Lake Caribou Herd rests in the Pik Dunes, a unique expanse of desertlike sand south of their calving grounds. The dunes offer the caribou relief from insects, their most numerous and relentless "predators." After calving takes place, insect-relief areas become essential for caribou survival.

Subhankar Banerjee

Caribou tracks on tundra. (Coal and the Caribou series)

Subhankar Banerjee

Caribou tracks on wetland. (Oil and the Geese series)

Subhankar Banerjee

Caribou crossing Utukok River. (Coal and the Caribou series)

Subhankar Banerjee

These are tracks on coal seams made by the Western Arctic caribou herd over a very long period, perhaps many centuries or even millenia. The tracks are deeply etched in the coal surface. Caribou use this area both for calving and post calving aggregation. (Coal and the Caribou series)

Subhankar Banerjee

Brant and snow geese on Teshekpuk Lake.

Subhankar Banerjee

Caribou tracks. (Oil and the Caribou series)

Subhankar Banerjee

A polygon mosaic takes shape when the ground freezes and cracks, allowing water to collect and form ice wedges that expande each winter.

Audubon Magazine

Polar Distress

With the clock running out in January, the Bush administration, ignoring the concerns of its own scientists and possibly breaking federal law, looks to open a vital stretch of Arctic habitat to offshore oil and gas drilling. So much for saving endangered bears.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
John Schoen

A brown bear stalks spawning salmon in an Alaskan river.

Subhankar Banerjee

Aerial View of Teshekpuk Lake Wetlands

U.S. FIsh and Wildlife Service
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
David Cline, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service