Travel

Lindsay Addison

Mason Inlet Waterbird Management Area

Mark Buckler

Marsh at Pine Island

The Bird-A-Day Challenge Has Begun

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Bird-A-Day Challenge Begins New Years Day 2012

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Penguins Offer Insight Into Climate Change

Seeking answers about our warming planet from Adélies living at the earth’s extremes.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Record Number of Scarlet Macaws Take Flight

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Sculptures Bring Big Birds to New York City

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Big Years and Birding

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

River of Raptors

One of the world’s greatest wildlife spectacles takes place every autumn as millions of hawks and other soaring birds funnel through Veracruz, Mexico, where a pioneering program aims to keep them flowing for millennia to come.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Kiwi Country

In a land where sheep outnumber people, a birder exploring New Zealand’s far corners encounters some of the rarest and most unusual birdlife on earth.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Per Breiehagen

Hardangervidda National Park’s constant winds make it a popular destination for ski sailors.

Per Breiehagen

Gaustatoppen stands guard over the southern fringe of the plateau.

Per Breiehagen

Golden eagles have been protected in Norway since 1968; Hardangervidda’s plentiful ptarmigan and rodent populations make it ideal eagle habitat.

Per Breiehagen

Spindrift smudges the horizon beyond Rauhelleren hut, in the center of the national park.

Per Breiehagen

Starched white snow takes on the hues of the early morning light.

Per Breiehagen

Roughly 7,000 reindeer, comprised of about 60 different herds, wander Hardangervidda.

Per Breiehagen

The plateau’s even topography is perfect for skiers hauling their gear in sleds, called pulks in Norwegian.

Per Breiehagen

Hardangervidda National Park’s treeless expanse, roughly the size of Rhode Island, virtually guarantees the winds will blow. The area is a magnet for ski sailors, who use kites, climbing harnesses, and special heavy-duty skis when they ride the wind. Mårbu hut, which is midway between the park’s northern and southern boundaries, is a popular overnight stop.

Audubon Magazine

Snow Patrol

A writer and her family embark on a cross-country ski quest to see wild reindeer in a powdery, wind-swept Norwegian national park that nearly conquered one legendary explorer.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Stepping Out

Masked by stinking anaerobic mud, fuggy heat, clouds of mosquitoes, and acre upon acre of flooded forest, mangroves are as mysterious as they are vital to our coasts.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Martin Westlake

The roots of a silk-cotton tree choke a courtyard in 12th century Ta Prohm, one of Angkor's largest, most evocative temples.

Martin Westlake
Martin Westlake

Cambodian women cycle atop a causeway overlooking the Ang Trapeang Thmor Sarus Crane Conservaion Area.

Martin Westlake
Martin Westlake
Martin Westlake

A local woman paddles a dugout through a seasonally inundated forest outside the fishing village of Kompong Phluk on the Tonle Sap, east of Siem Reap.

Martin Westlake

While driver Thuy Chhoam looks on, the author, Christopher R. Cox, scans the grasslands north of Tonle Sap lake in Cambodia for the critically endangered Bengal florican. The floodwaters of the Tonle Sap can rise more than 30 feet during the monsoon season.

Green Travel: Cambodia

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine