Wildlife

Photograph by Dylan Coker/Barcroft Media/Getty Images

NOVAYA ZEMLYA, RUSSIA - JULY 30: A hungry polar bear inching down a 100m cliff face towards nesting Brunnich's Guillemots in a desperate search for food on July 30, 2011 in Novaya Zemlya, Russia. Melting ice and a scarcity of readily available food is turning polar bears in a Russian national park into polar explorers.The amazing images were captured by veteran photographer Dylan Coker, 40, who was exploring the Novaya Zemlya archipelago in the Russian Arctic last month. Stunned passengers onboard a ice strengthened boat chartered by Aurora Expeditions watched as the young male polar bear risked his life scavenging for eggs along a sheer cliff face on one of the two islands that make up Ostrova Oranskie. Dylan, who is originally from California but now lives in Australia, was four days into his polar adventure when he photographed the previously undocumented spectacle. It was a really beautiful place; very foggy, cool, and serene with a sky full of squawking birds, Dylan explained. We rounded a corner and suddenly we could see this white blob at the top of some cliffs which we realised was a polar bear.Everyone on the boat was quiet, we just sat there in awe. The height that the bear was at and the sheerness of the cliff face were absolutely amazing.

Audubon Magazine

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Temperature Graph courtesy of NMFS/NOAA; Atlantic Moonfish photo by Emily Pollom
Audubon Magazine

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Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
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