Wildlife

Greetings From a Chinese EcoPark, Part III

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

House Votes Down Public Lands Bill

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Pink Dolphin

A pink bottlenose dolphin in Louisiana lake becomes a fast celebrity, but it could be to the animal's detriment.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Preventing Bat Illness: A Potential Solution?

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Obama Freezes Bush Administration

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

First Collared Jaguar in the U.S. Euthanized

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Save the Wild Cats

Wild cats protect humans from disease
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Desert Ants Use Odors To Find Their Way Home

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Odd Behavior: Young Ravens Don

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Jaguar Collared for the First Time in the U.S.

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Fish Gotta Swim

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

The Mayor's Birds

Kampala's storks are a key to the city's waste disposal
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Tracking Rhinos

Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary lets you get up close and personal with Uganda's only rhinos.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Goose Eggs May Sustain Some Polar Bears

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Uncovering How Wildlife Corridors Work

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Save Farmland: Yes, You Can

Have Your Own Story? We would love to hear what you, your neighbors, or your town are doing to save farmland and open space. Post a comment below and tell us about your experiences.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

New Regs to Keep Drugs Out of Waterways

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Take a Virtual Trip to Teshekpuk Lake

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Astonishing New Sea Life

Beneath the surface of the Earth’s oceans lurks a strange and wonderful world filled with unique sea creatures that no one has ever seen before. But thousands of the marine animals have begun to surface recently, thanks to an Olympian effort by a consortium of roughly 2,000 scientists from 82 countries. The latest findings of the survey, called the Census of Marine Life, were reported this week at the World Conference on Marine Biodiversity in Valencia, Spain. Since 2000, when the census began, survey scientists have identified 5,300 possible new species (more than 100 have so far gone through the rigorous process to gain the official designation as “new”).
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Supreme Court Rules on Sonar

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Warring Warblers

He might seem handsome and sweet, but don’t be mistaken—the Townsend’s warbler is a bully who clobbers a guy and steels his girlfriend. That’s what dogged detective work by University of Washington doctoral student Meade Krosby has revealed, solving the cold case of the disappearing hermit warbler.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Farmland: Disappearing Act

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine